Archive for the Category: ' Phone '

Posted By Tommy

Edu account email on Android

I’ve got a Nexus One, and I want to receive my Microsoft Live@Edu account on my phone.

It should be easy to do and it is except that there’s some information that is required to do this.
The main thing is the server address. It is listed at:
http://www.microsoft.com/online/help/en-us/helphowto/c0a1a4b9-111f-4bd4-8fab-8147344cd278.htm

Mobile Device URLs
Your mobile device URL is determined by the storage location of your Microsoft Online Services data. To connect to Microsoft Exchange Online, your cellular service plan must support Windows Mobile.

Asia Pacific (APAC) https://red003.mail.apac.microsoftonline.com
Europe, the Middle East, and Africa (EMEA) https://red002.mail.emea.microsoftonline.com
North America https://red001.mail.microsoftonline.com

Select the correct server. For Australia, that’s then red003.mail.apac.microsoftonline.com

You also need your domain\username, where domain is nothing (“”), and username is your email. So you should get something like: \email.name@flinders.edu.au
Notice that backslash. You need it. On my phone on-screen keyboard, I needed to press the numbers button to bring up the numbers on-screen keyboard, and then press the symbols button to bring up the symbols on-screen keyboard.

So open up the Email Application, open the menu with the menu button, then fill in your email address and password. The easiest thing to do is select “Manual setup” where you can then select Microsoft Exchange ActiveSync. Now it’s time to enter the details we worked out above.

Domain\Username: \email.name@flinders.edu.au
Password: ***********
Server: red003.mail.apac.microsoftonline.com

That’s it! Press Next, and iff you’re lucky, you’re now the proud owner of a Microsoft Exchange Sync account that pushes to your mobile phone. In my experience the push delivers the mail almost instantly after it’s sent, but it doesn’t drain the battery like the Twitter push.

Posted By Tommy

Create new Froyo Virtual Device for Nexus One

 

So it’s time to start developing Android apps, but you have a Nexus One running Froyo 2.2. What are you supposed to do at the stage “Create new Android Virtual Device (AVD)”? That’s exactly the question I was tackling today. In fact it’s not too important, since you would be developing for all types of Android phones, not just Nexus One, but in principle it seems right to set up the emulator exactly for the Nexus One.

So the first thing to do when creating a new virtual device is to give it a name. I was thinking about calling mine “NexusOne” but then I thought I should add a little more detail. However, there is a restriction in the naming policy: you are only allowed to include letters and numbers, no spaces or decimal points (but yes to underscores). This means the logical name “Nexus One Froyo 2.2” is no good. Finally I settled on “Nexus_One_Froyo_2-2”. I selected Target: “Android 2.2 – API Level 8”. If you don’t have it as an option, you need to run the Android SDK updater.

Next select the size of the SD card. I put 2000 MiB.

And the skin of the Nexus One would correctly be WVGA800, which corresponds to 800 x 480 resolution. Technically it’s a slightly different since the particular screen used, but it’s effectively the WVGA800.

Next there’s a bunch of settings to add. I’ve seen some people suggest you need to add all the hardware components manually, but according to the following chart most of the stuff is there by default. (Chart is from http://www.51testing.com/?uid-49689-action-viewspace-itemid-212142)

Characteristic Description Property
Device ram size The amount of physical RAM on the device, in megabytes. Default value is “96”. hw.ramSize
Touch-screen support Whether there is a touch screen or not on the device. Default value is “yes”. hw.touchScreen
Trackball support Whether there is a trackball on the device. Default value is “yes”. hw.trackBall
Keyboard support Whether the device has a QWERTY keyboard. Default value is “yes”. hw.keyboard
DPad support Whether the device has DPad keys. Default value is “yes”. hw.dPad
GSM modem support Whether there is a GSM modem in the device. Default value is “yes”. hw.gsmModem
Camera support Whether the device has a camera. Default value is “no”. hw.camera
Maximum horizontal camera pixels Default value is “640”. hw.camera.maxHorizontalPixels
Maximum vertical camera pixels Default value is “480”. hw.camera.maxVerticalPixels
GPS support Whether there is a GPS in the device. Default value is “yes”. hw.gps
Battery support Whether the device can run on a battery. Default value is “yes”. hw.battery
Accelerometer Whether there is an accelerometer in the device. Default value is “yes”. hw.accelerometer
Audio recording support Whether the device can record audio. Default value is “yes”. hw.audioInput
Audio playback support Whether the device can play audio. Default value is “yes”. hw.audioOutput
SD Card support Whether the device supports insertion/removal of virtual SD Cards. Default value is “yes”. hw.sdCard
Cache partition support Whether we use a /cache partition on the device. Default value is “yes”. disk.cachePartition
Cache partition size Default value is “66MB”. disk.cachePartition.size

Thus according to the chart we should add “Camera” and the 5.0 megapixel camera on the Nexus One corresponds to 2592 Maximum Horizontal Camera Pixels and 1944 Maximum Vertical Camera Pixels (The exact number of pixels is a guess of mine based on the 5.0 Megapixels, but unless you’re doing some hardcore testing I think it will be fine). Set the Device RAM Size to 512 MB for the Nexus One.

Ok, that’s about it. Now click “Create AVD” and the program will appear to freeze for a while. Finally, the AVD will be created and Nexus_One_Froyo_2-2 is located in the .android\avd folder.